The Capture of Hugh Burn and Richard McGwire

On the 1st of June 1815, two members of Michael Howe’s gang, Hugh Burn and Richard McGwire were captured at Kangaroo Point (Bellerive) and brought into Hobart Town. After having been attracted to a hut near Tea Tree Brush by the smoke that rose from its chimney, a party of the 46th Regiment spied HughContinue reading “The Capture of Hugh Burn and Richard McGwire”

A Body for the Gibbet

On the 20th of May 1815, the headless body of James Whitehead was gibbeted on Hunter Island near Hobart Town, after being brought down in a boat from New Norfolk the previous night. In his diary, Reverend Robert Knopwood wrote, “the man that was shot was Whitehead, a very desperate bushranger. He was hung upContinue reading “A Body for the Gibbet”

Gentlemen Bushrangers

While some writers may wish to state otherwise, Michael and his gang were known to act gentlemanly and respectfully around the women and men whose company they found themselves in. As James Calder himself states, “none of these pillaging’s were attended with personal violence of any kind…Howe disliked unnecessary violence, and though he sometimes threatenedContinue reading “Gentlemen Bushrangers”

A Rascally Letter

On the 27th of November 1816, while John Yorke was riding from Port Dalrymple to Hobart Town, he found himself bailed up by Michael Howe and his gang at York Plains. Michael had a letter he wanted given to Lieutenant-Governor Davey, written in gang member Peter Septon’s hand, which in it saw Michael complaining ofContinue reading “A Rascally Letter”

The Capture of Michael Howe in 1817

Being in regular contact with William Drew, Michael had no reason to suspect that he would be the one to betray him. The bushranger had made several visits to the shepherd’s hut, as well as giving him a letter to deliver to Sorell after his escape from gaol. However, loyalty was a foreign word toContinue reading “The Capture of Michael Howe in 1817”

The Surrender of Michael in 1817

Following Governor Sorell’s proclamation, Michael wrote a letter to Sorell, which was delivered into Hobart Town by a constable. The man who had given the letter to the constable was probably William Drew, a man who was known to act as Michael’s go-between. According to Bob Minchin, “the meeting between Captain Nair and himself wasContinue reading “The Surrender of Michael in 1817”

A Spot of Tea at Humphrey’s

At about seven o’clock in the evening on the 10th of May 1815, James Whitehead, Peter Septon, Thomas Collier, Richard McGwyre and James Geary rushed into the servant hut of Mr Adolarious William Henry Humphrey at Pitt Water and bailed up the male servants inside, tying their hands with the handkerchiefs they wore around theirContinue reading “A Spot of Tea at Humphrey’s”

MICHAEL HOWE’S LAMENT

Scene–Michael Howe’s Marsh, near Anstey Barton, Van Diemen’s Land. Through pathless wilds condemn’d to roam, Untrod, perchance, by other feet, No more I find a tranquil home, Nor dare my fellow-mortals meet. My gloomy brow is seamed by care, And deep remorse weighs down my soul; My days are pass’d in dark despair, The nightsContinue reading “MICHAEL HOWE’S LAMENT”